Speakers

Topic Summary
Thursday, 14th
Name/email adress Bio
Morning Plenary     The Global Context of Food Security: Challenges and Opportunities for Action
Jerry Buckland
Jerry Buckland teaches International Development Studies with Menno Simons College at the University of Winnipeg and Canadian Mennonite University. One of his areas of specialization is rural development. He spent five years working with and studying NGO rural development schemes in Bangladesh. Jerry has recently completed a book examining how markets, trade and modern technology are shaping farming and affecting farmers’ livelihoods  around the world.
Globalization and Poverty
“Getting prices right” was an expression used by the World Bank and others in the 1980s to call for liberalization of markets and trade in order to assist under-paid producers such as farmers in the South. Structural adjustment programs (SAPs) were the policies that were intended to foster competitive market institutions that would be better than state institutions in achieving development. But 25 years later we can see that prices farmers receive for their products have not improved. Moreover the market institutions such as the World Trade Organization and transnational corporations have not succeeded in creating competitive markets, free from state and corporate control. The result is continuing poverty for small farmers and Southern farming nations. What is needed is a revisioning of the importance of food security and farmer livelihoods and conforming state and international institutions to support these goals.
Rieky Stewart
NGO involvement in International FS Policy
Ag Canada
Morning Plenary     The Global Context of Food Security: Challenges and Opportunities for Action
Nettie Wiebe
Nettie Wiebe farms with her husband at Laura, Saskatchewan, growing organic grains and pulse crops as well as raising cattle.  In addition to caring for their four children, she served as Women’s President of the National Farmers Union (NFU) from 1989-1994.  She was elected President of the NFU in January 1995, the first woman to lead a national farm organization in Canada, a position she held for four years.   She is currently the Professor of Church and Society, lecturing on ethics and social and economic justice at St. Andrew’s College, University of Saskatchewan.  A writer, panelist and speaker on agriculture, environment, public policy and trade issues, Dr. Wiebe has been an advocate for farm families and rural communities  in many forums in Canada and abroad.  She is a coordinating member of the Via Campesina, a global movement of peasants and small-scale farmers.  She was presented with the Distinguished Canadian Award by the Council of Canadians in November, 1999.
Globalization and Farmers
Global Effects on Employment and Poverty
Rickie Stuart
Hank Venema
Dr. Henry David Venema is a professional engineer and natural resource management consultant with extensive experience in rural energy, rural development, water resources planning, and conventional energy sector planning in North America, Africa, and Asia.  Dr. Venema’s research on systems approaches for climate change mitigation/adaptation synergy through integrated village energy planning has appeared in the Journal of Environmental Management, Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change and Global Environmental Change, and has been widely cited by the IPCC’s Third Assessment Report on Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. His research has also appeared in the water resources, hydrology, renewable energy and operations research literature.
Climate Change and Food Security
My talk will be about an analysis and interpretation of the “double exposure” of the Indian agricultural sector to the joint effects of climate change and agricultural trade liberalization, and will include a discussion of village-level case studies.  I will also discuss improving policy coherence between the climate change convention and the WTO.
International Agricultural Trade and Food Security
Jim Cornelius
Jim Cornelius is the Executive Director of Canadian Foodgrains Bank, a position he has held since 1997.  Before joining the Foodgrains Bank, Jim worked as a management consultant for 15 years, specializing in international relief and development. He has conducted numerous assignments for the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and various non- governmental organizations and has traveled extensively to many countries in the world.  During his 15 year consulting career, he took five years to serve as Vice-President of Optima Consultants in Applied Social Research where he focused more on social and market research in Canada.  Jim did his graduate studies in international development at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs in Ottawa.  He has an Honours B.A. in Sociology and African Studies from York University in Toronto, and studied Business Administration at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in Toronto.
International Food Aid and Food Security
Anna Paskal
Anna Paskal is a Program Manager with Inter Pares, an international social justice organization based in Ottawa. Anna works in the Asia program, focusing primarily on food security/food sovereignty and food politics. Anna completed graduate studies at Sussex University, is a published author and an award-winning documentary filmmaker.
Local Approaches to Food Security/Food Sovereignty: Examples From Biodiversity- based Food Systems in India and Connections With Work in Canada
This workshop will explore principles of community-based food security, both through the lens of innovative village-level work being undertaken by women’s groups in rural India, and examples brought forward by participants. Working together, participants will discuss the impact that community-based food security work they have come in contact with either locally, regionally or nationally has affected their own work, and the connection between this and work taking place internationally.
Afternoon Plenary     The Costs of Food for: the Land, Producers and Consumers
Charles Seiden
Charles joined the Canadian Association of Food Banks as Executive in October 2001. He has extensive experience in fundraising, working with the Donor Relations Team Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation and as National Fundraising Coordinator of Canadian Crossroads International. Charles worked for 15 years with Youthful Offenders, as Executive Director of a Crisis Centre for Adolescents and as Executive Director of Child and Family Mental Health Centre. Charles graduated from York University with a BA in Psychology and the University of Toronto with a Masters in Criminology. He then earned a National Certificate in Voluntary Sector Management from the School of Business at York University and the Canadian Centre of Philanthropy.  He has served on numerous voluntary boards and committees of community organizations.
Food Affordability for Consumers
Rod Macrae
Rod MacRae is a food policy analyst, working primarily on strategies to create food security in Canada, changes to the environment pillar of the new Agriculture Policy Framework, and policy drivers for organic agriculture.  He consults to the NGO sector and writes extensively on these topics and teaches at Ryerson and York Universities.  Rod has a Ph.D. from McGill.
The Cost of Food for the Land
We have cheap food for many Canadians, but this cheapness means additional expenses for someone or something else.  Two that suffer are farmers and their land.  Because farmers only receive a small percentage of the consumer dollar, and the marketplace doesn’t always reward them for their environmental investments, farm finances suffer, making it more difficult  to be stewards of the land.
Afternoon Plenary     The Costs of Food for: the Land, Producers and Consumers
Darrin Qualmann
Darrin Qualman lives near Dundurn, Saskatchewan, in western Canada.  He and his family farmed actively until 1994.  They grew several grains, oilseeds, and spices. He worked on energy and environmental issues in the early 1990s and became the Executive Secretary of the National Farmers Union in June of 1996.  In 2004, Darrin became the NFU’s Director of Research.  The NFU works to ensure that the family farm remains the principle unit of food production in Canada. Darrin is the author of “The Farm Crisis and Corporate Power”; “The Farm Crisis, Bigger Farms, and the Myths of ‘Competition’ and ‘Efficiency’”; and, with Nettie Wiebe, “The Structural Adjustment of Canadian Agriculture”.  He has made presentations on agricultural and trade issues across Canada and in Europe.
Food Producers and the Cost of Food
This presentation on “The Costs of Food” panel, will touch on the farm income crisis and the “costs” to farmers and rural communities.  Some highlights will include: 1. Some myths about the farm income crisis: oversupply (Brazil), inefficiency, European subsidies. 2. The real causes of the crisis: Corporate profiteering:  Farmers are making too little because others are taking too much.
Cost of Food and Cdn Fisheries
Afternoon Workshop
Debora Lyall
Acting Director, Marketing and Farm Business Management Branch Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives
• Professional Home Economist with degree from University of Manitoba • Certificate in Public Sector Management • Currently working on her Masters in Adult Education • As an Acting Director with Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives, she works closely with many of the key issues concerning farming, farm families and rural communities such as: farm finances, family farm business relationships, leadership skill development, developing new food businesses and market opportunities, community development and 4-H programs. • Two beautiful young adult daughters • Enjoy curling, cross county skiing, socializing with friends and being involved in community action that can make a difference in people’s lives.
Food Affordability in the North
This presentation will describe a recent study of issues relating to the high cost of nutritious food in Northern Manitoba called The Northern Food Prices Project. The project was undertaken with a broad range of participation and input including all the major Northern Stakeholders. The project report offers substantial understanding of the complexity of issues resulting in high food prices. A discussion of these complex issues makes it  apparent that solutions to reduce food prices must be community based and in partnership with the food industry, Northern leadership, and government. An opportunity for group discussion and brainstorming ideas will be included in the workshop.
Cindy Coker
Cindy is presently the executive director for SEED Winnipeg, Inc., a community economic development organization in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Previously, she worked at SEED Winnipeg helping to design and implement their community and worker ownership program.  She has 15 years of experience working in the economic development field in the United States, primarily using a worker cooperative model for enterprise development.
Successful Community Economic Development Projects
After a review of characteristics of a community economic development (CED) approach to economic development examples of local Winnipeg projects will be presented.  Discussion will focus on moving from the theory to implementation and the potentially broader social and economic impacts of CED projects.  The focus will also be on strategies being pursued in Winnipeg to support the broader use of CED as a strategy for development of the community as a whole.
Afternoon Workshop
Karen Archibald
Karen Archibald is Executive Director of  CHEP, the Child Hunger and Education Program. . Under her leadership CHEP has developed  comprehensive community based  food security programs ranging from children’s nutrition programs at more than 35 city locations,  to community gardens and a strong Good Food Box program, to rural/urban alternative food links to a core neighbourhood food store.  Karen began her work life in the health field  in medical laboratory technology, lived overseas for a few years, studied and worked in early childhood development and volunteered in her community wherever she was.    After treating herself to a Sociology degree in the early 90’s she joined CHEP where she values not only the organization’s progressive approach in addressing food security issues and working with community but also the opportunity CHEP has provided her to apply politics and passion in the workplace.
Community- based Food Programs: what works?
“From the Good Food Box to community gardens and student nutrition programs, every city in Canada now has a myriad of grass roots community based programs that work to improve people’s access to healthy affordable food and also build community. Karen Archibald, the Executive Director of CHEP (the Child Hunger Education Project) and Debbie Field, the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto have helped to design, implement, establish and fund many of these programs. From the operational as well as policy level they will talk about the programs that work best, the ones that have failed, and their dreams and hopes for sustained and new food programs in the next decade.”
Afternoon Workshop
Debbie Field
Community- based Food Programs: what works?
“From the Good Food Box to community gardens and student nutrition programs, every city in Canada now has a myriad of grass roots community based programs that work to improve people’s access to healthy affordable food and also build community. Karen Archibald, the Executive Director of CHEP (the Child Hunger Education Project) and Debbie Field, the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto have helped to design, implement, establish and fund many of these programs. From the operational as well as policy level they will talk about the programs that work best, the ones that have failed, and their dreams and hopes for sustained and new food programs in the next decade.”
For the past twelve years, Debbie Field has been the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto. She came to FoodShare through her role as a founding member of the Coalition for Student Nutrition. As a parent she was instrumental in organizing a hot lunch program at her children’s school. A long standing activist in a variety of social movements, Debbie began her work life  in 1976 as a teacher at Brampton’s Sheridan College. Next she was Canada’s first Equal Opportunities Coordinator, working for OPSEU (the Ontario Public Service Employees Union). In 1979, along with four other women, Debbie was successful in her Human Rights’ complaint against Stelco in Hamilton for their no-women hiring policy. She was then hired and worked in the coke ovens until the strike in 1981. In the 1980’s she was the Coordinator of the Development Education Centre, a non-profit resource centre specialising in third world issues, and prior to coming to FoodShare in 1992, Executive Assistant to Metro Councillor’s Dale Martin and Olivia Chow. Debbie has an honour’s B.A. in Sociology from Trent University and a Masters in Adult Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. She lives with her husband David Kraft and their two children, Molly age 16 and Joe age 19, in Toronto’. West-end.
Afternoon Workshop
Gregoire Lamoureux
Gregoire Lamoureux is a farmer and owner of Spiral Farm in Winlaw, BC he is also the director of the Kootenay Permaculture Institute. He has over twelve years of experience as a permaculture designer, consultant and teacher in many parts of the country. He’s on the Board of Directors of Seeds of Diversity Canada and a founding member of Kootenay Organic Growers Society where he sat on the Certifying Committee for three years. He has written articles for Natural Life and Eco Farm & Garden magazines. Gregoire has been a guest lecturer at many conferences including the BC Organic Agriculture Conference and the Guelph Organic Agriculture Conference.
South Asia/Canada Dialogue on the Future of Agriculture
This workshop will be about a set of proposal called the Common Ground Statement which were drafted during a cross cultural exchange between farmers from Canada and South Asia.  The itemized proposals are the result of an inspirational visioning session we held at the IFOAM 2002 conference. We would like to engage the audience in a dialogue about food security on a global front.  We would like to share the insights we learned from our tour of India and Nepal, as well as the great challenges with which we continue to struggle.
Robin Tunnicliffe
I have been farming on Vancouver Island for the past 6 years.  I rent the land I use, and I sell my produce through a women’s cooperative called Saanich Organics. We market to 25 of Victoria’s top restaurants, we have a vegetable home delivery service for 50 families, and we also sell at the Moss St. Market. I currently sit on the board of Linking Land and Future Farmers, and I am past-chair of the South Island Organic Producers’ Association.  I travelled to India and Nepal to on a cross cultural farmer to farmer exchange with SANFEC in 2003.  I have had several articles on organic farming practices published  in Eco Farm and Garden, and in BC Gardener.  I am a graduate from the University of Guelph.
Afternoon Workshop
Ramona Scott
Jonaki Bhattacharyya
Jonaki Bhattacharyya, TLC’s Agricultural Liaison in the Okanagan Region has an MES in Environmental Studies and experience working with organic farmers in the southern Interior of BC, coordinating a community-based ecological monitoring program, as well as teaching a course in Food Systems and Food Security at the University of Victoria. Land Conservancy and Agriculture Land Trusts
Agriculture and Conservation: Striving for the Best of Both in One World What do agriculture and habitat conservation have in common?  Farmers and ranchers share more with rare and threatened species than you might think.  Both are facing increasing pressures and a loss of land, and both need diverse ecosystems to survive in the long term.  This workshop will focus on the relationship between sustainable agriculture, biodiversity, and the conservation of natural systems.  We will discuss grounded examples and case studies as we explore the ways in which farming and conservation can be complementary activities.  This  is an interactive workshop, in which participants will be encouraged to share their stories, ideas and concerns, as we work together to identify solutions and strategies for future developments in agriculture and conservation.
TLC’s Agricultural Liaison, Ramona Scott, MA, has 35 years combined work experience in park planning, management, conservation and agriculture. She has recently successfully completed the BC Environmental Farm Planning course.
Afternoon Workshop
Darrin Qualmann
Darrin Qualman lives near Dundurn, Saskatchewan, in western Canada.  He and his family farmed actively until 1994.  They grew several grains, oilseeds, and spices. He worked on energy and environmental issues in the early 1990s and became the Executive Secretary of the National Farmers Union in June of 1996.  In 2004, Darrin became the NFU’s Director of Research.  The NFU works to ensure that the family farm remains the principle unit of food production in Canada. Darrin is the author of “The Farm Crisis and Corporate Power”; “The Farm Crisis, Bigger Farms, and the Myths of ‘Competition’ and ‘Efficiency’”; and, with Nettie Wiebe, “The Structural Adjustment of Canadian Agriculture”.  He has made presentations on agricultural and trade issues across Canada and in Europe.
Linking Producers and the Land
A discussion on the high input costs draining farmers net incomes and as well as information about increased energy and water use.  Some solutions: input-reduction, organic production, non-GM, production for local use, reducing Canadian production and exports, managing supply, producing for domestic markets only….  Darrin will challenge people to think about a system based—not on the traditional models of increased production and exports—but on a more subtle and nuanced system that pursued true efficiency, sufficiency, and adequate nutrition for the largest number of people.
Gary Martens
Public Town Hall                   Do GMO’s have a role in food security?
Brewster Kneen
Brewster Kneen has had a diverse activist career of writing, farming and lecturing.  From 1971 to 1986, the Kneens (wife Cathleen and children Jamie and Rebecca) farmed in Nova Scotia, developing a large commercial sheep farm, a lamb marketing co-op and a co-op abattoir.   In 1980, the Kneens started publishing The Ram’s Horn. After a nine-year sojourn in Toronto, the Kneens moved to British Columbia in 1995 and now live in Sorrento, B.C. Since leaving the farm in 1986, Brewster authored five books, the most recent being Farmageddon: Food and the Culture of Biotechnology (New Society Publishers, 1999).
Gary Martens is an instructor and research farm manager in the Plant Science department at the University of Manitoba. His area of interest is crop production with a special interest in weeds and weed management. Gary is involved in the annual Crop Diagnostic school held in the field in Carman every summer. He is presently involved in a number of research projects including: aerial photography for remotely sensing weed patches, using anhydrous ammonia for weed control and pesticide free production. Before working for the University of Manitoba, Gary operated a crop farm and was an agronomist with Team Landmark, giving farmers advice about cropping decisions including weed management. Gary and his wife Patricia live on a small farm in the town of Kleefeld, Manitoba where Gary practices some of the crop rotation and crop management techniques that he teaches in the winter. Gary and Patricia attend the Kleefeld Evangelical Mennonite Church where he serves as a lay minister.
Public Town Hall                   Do GMO’s have a role in food security?
Curtis Rempel
Dr. Curtis Rempel is the Technology Project Manager with Monsanto Canada, based in Winnipeg, Manitoba and has held this position since May of 2004. Prior to this, Curtis served as Monsanto Canada’s technical and project lead on Monsanto’s Roundup Ready wheat development project for four years. Curtis also has extensive research experience in the public sector, holding positions at University of Manitoba, University of Guelph, and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, in addition to conducting private sector research with a number of companies prior to joining Monsanto. Dr. Rempel is also an active farmer in the Red River Valley of Manitoba where he has grown both conventional and biotech crops. Dr. Rempel holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Biology from the University of Guelph and an MBA from the University of Guelph and Athabasca University. He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Manitoba in the Department of Plant Science. Monsanto Canada, based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is a subsidiary of Monsanto, a leading provider of technology-based solutions and agricultural products that improve farm productivity.
Date Slot
Topic Summary
Friday, 15th
Joyce Slater
Name/email adress Bio
Morning Plenary    Safe and Nutritious Food
Joyce Slater is a registered dietitian with 12 years of experience in public health.  She has worked in a variety of organizations in both Ontario and Manitoba. She is currently doing her Ph.D. at the University of Manitoba and her research topic is the food system and other socio-environmental influences on childhood obesity.  As part of her Ph.D., Joyce is also in a training program with the International Centre for Infectious Diseases in Winnipeg.  Joyce has two children, Jesse and Kate ages 5 and 7.
Processed Food and Nutritional Health
Jean-Charles Le Vallée
Jean-Charles Le Vallée has worked as a food security specialist with several universities, consulting firms, the Canadian government, the U.N., IFPRI and the World Bank. He is an agricultural economist, agronomist, ecologist and nutritionist. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D in food security at Carleton University’s Department of Geography and Environmental Studies on the vulnerability of food systems.
Precautionary Principle and Federal Regulatory Initiatives
Presentation on the Precautionary Principle and Federal Food Regulatory Initiatives Panel on Safe and Nutritious Food
Trevor Hancock
Morning Workshop
Janine Gibson
Morning Plenary    Safe and Nutritious Food
Dr. Trevor Hancock is a public health physician and independent health promotion consultant who has worked for local communities, municipal, provincial and national governments, health care organizations and the World Health Organization. He is currently a public health consultant at the Ministry of Health Planning in British Columbia, where he is developing core programs in public health and contributing to a province-wide chronic disease prevention initiative. His main areas of interest are health promotion, healthy cities/ communities, healthy public policy, environmental health, health policy and planning, and health futurism.
Food Security – A Core Function for Public Health
Janine Gibson works as an organic inspector and international trainer of inspectors, to support a more local food system that respects people and the environment. She volunteers extensively as the National President of Canadian Organic Growers.
Organic Certification Programs
Janine will encourage a dialogue about how organic agriculture, its standards and procedures supports local food security
Morning Workshop
Joyce Slater
Joyce Slater is a registered dietitian with 12 years of experience in public health.  She has worked in a variety of organizations in both Ontario and Manitoba. She is currently doing her Ph.D. at the University of Manitoba and her research topic is the food system and other socio-environmental influences on childhood obesity.  As part of her Ph.D., Joyce is also in a training program with the International Centre for Infectious Diseases in Winnipeg.  Joyce has two children, Jesse and Kate ages 5 and 7.
Childhood Obesit: What does the future Hold?
More kids are overweight than a generation ago.  We know they’re not active enough.  We know they should be “eating better.”  But how will this happen?  We need to move beyond traditional “lifestyle” education and programs for promoting healthy body weights.  Joyce Slater, registered dietitian, will facilitate a workshop in which participants explore options for dealing with childhood weight issues.  Participants will join in a “futuring” exercise and construct different scenarios for the future of our children based on different action paths.
Lisa Lacroix
Lisa Lacroix is a regional program consultant with the Population and Public Health Branch of Health Canada.  Lisa is responsible for the management of the Prevention and Promotion Contribution Fund in Manitoba for the Canadian Diabetes Strategy and regional components of the Population Health Fund.  Her work involves providing support to community-based organizations funded by Health Canada to address diabetes prevention using a population health approach.  In reality, she is sometimes the “feared and dreaded funder” but works hard to dispel those myths! Diabetes and Chronic Disease Prevention
This workshop will focus on diabetes and chronic disease prevention and control.  It will provide information on the current state of diabetes and chronic disease in Canada and Manitoba; identify common risk factors for prevention using a population and public health approach including demonstrating the link between diabetes and chronic disease prevention and food security.
Morning Workshop
Ian Mauro
Diabetes and Chronic Disease Prevention
This workshop will focus on diabetes and chronic disease prevention and control.  It will provide information on the current state of diabetes and chronic disease in Canada and Manitoba; identify common risk factors for prevention using a population and public health approach including demonstrating the link between diabetes and chronic disease prevention and food security.
Kelly McQuillen
Kelly is the Manager, Diabetes & Chronic Disease, Public Health, Manitoba Health.  The primary responsibility of the Diabetes & Chronic Diseases Unit is to coordinate the provincial response to the major epidemic of Type 2 diabetes, in addition to establishing the provincial direction for chronic disease prevention and control.
Ian Mauro is a doctoral student and instructor in the Faculty of Environment, University of Manitoba. His research project entitled, “Risk Analysis of Genetically Modified (GM) crops on the Canadian Prairies”, involves working with farmers to assess their experiences and perceptions pertaining to the risks and benefits of herbicide tolerant (HT) canola and wheat. In summer 2004, he traveled to Baffin Island where he taught ‘Traditional Land Use and Ecology of Cumberland Sound’, a course which focused largely on food security issues in the North. He is also a filmmaker and has completed an educational video on the impacts of Roundup Ready wheat that has been shown extensively in Canada, U.S.A., Europe, Japan and Australia and is currently working on two documentary videos entitled: ‘Of Mice and Men: The Story of Life Patents in Canada’ and ‘Seeds of Change’.
POPs, GMOs, and Subsistence in the 21st Century
This workshop will be cross cultural, dealing with hunters and farmers, and the impact the chemical and lifescience industries have had on people practicing subsistence-based lifestyles. Topics to be discussed include: 1) Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and the contamination of Inuit country food; 2) Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and the risks this technology poses for farmers and consumers; and 3) The larger root causes of dangerous substances that compromise food security and the environment. This session will feature a multimedia presentation, including video and photos of Prairie farmers and Eastern Arctic hunters, which will dynamically bring the workshop to life.
Morning Workshop
Debbie Field        Child Nutrition
Cathy Holtslander
Cathy Holtslander, the Beyond Factory Farming Coalition’s project organizer, works with grass- roots activists fighting industrial livestock operations and promoting ecologically, economically and socially viable alternatives. She co-edited Beyond Factory Farming: Corporate Hog Barns and the Threat to Public Health, the Environment and Rural Communities, published by the CCPA in 2003.
Safety of Our Meat Supply
The Safety of our Meat: Market-driven Madness? Are Avian flu, BSE and e-coli contaminated hamburger alerts isolated incidents? Or are they the harbingers of future food safety crises in Canada? Industrial livestock operations displace family farms and meat is processed by giant meatpackers. When profits are gained through de-regulation and offloading costs, health and the food safety are compromised. What can we do about it?
Topical Symposia       Mini tours
For the past twelve years, Debbie Field has been the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto. She came to FoodShare through her role as a founding member of the Coalition for Student Nutrition. As a parent she was instrumental in organizing a hot lunch program at her children’s school. A long standing activist in a variety of social movements, Debbie began her work life  in 1976 as a teacher at Brampton’s Sheridan College. Next she was Canada’s first Equal Opportunities Coordinator, working for OPSEU (the Ontario Public Service Employees Union). In 1979, along with four other women, Debbie was successful in her Human Rights’ complaint against Stelco in Hamilton for their no-women hiring policy. She was then hired and worked in the coke ovens until the strike in 1981. In the 1980’s she was the Coordinator of the Development Education Centre, a non-profit resource centre specialising in third world issues, and prior to coming to FoodShare in 1992, Executive Assistant to Metro Councillor’s Dale Martin and Olivia Chow. Debbie has an honour’s B.A. in Sociology from Trent University and a Masters in Adult Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. She lives with her husband David Kraft and their two children, Molly age 16 and Joe age 19, in Toronto’. West-end.
Canada remains one of the only countries in the world to ignore the need for strong federal child and student nutrition policies. No one is paying attention to how children are, or are not, eating. The Symposium will explore a variety of issues from the a new approach to the Education Act so that schools in every province build cafeterias, provide subsidized healthy meal programs, and expand the curriculum to teach nutrition, to the need for Federal, Provincial and Municipal funding of school based student nutrition programs, and a national strategy against childhood obesity.
To be confirmed
Janine Gibson
Charlene Rowland
Topical Symposia       Mini tours
Aboriginal Food Security
Janine Gibson works as an organic inspector and international trainer of inspectors, to support a more local food system that respects people and the environment. She volunteers extensively as the National President of Canadian Organic Growers.
Organics in Manitoba
Local Food Businesses
Charlene Rowland has been actively involved with the Youth in Alternative Agriculture Movement for over ten years. Her work includes being a founding member of the River Hills Eco- village located near the Whiteshell Provincial Park, Manitoba. She enjoys studying Permaculture design and graduated from a two week Permaculture Designer’s Certification course in Sonoma County, California during June 1996. Charlene helped to develop & coordinates the Organic Farm Mentorship Program. This unique project uses hands-on work experiences facilitated by local organic farmers to teach young apprentices valuable farming techniques & skills. Currently, Charlene has been working in the Winnipeg School Division teaching Food Security Issues to high school students as part of an ongoing Youth Outreach Project.
Youth and Food Security
Stuart Clark Moderator
Public Town Hall                   Human Right to Food and Local Food Charters
Stuart Clark is currently the Senior Policy Advisor to the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.  For the past thirty years he has worked in the field of food processing, international agricultural development, food aid and farming.  His current work focuses on international agricultural trade rules, Canadian food aid and international development policy and the Right to Food in the international context.  Stu lives in Winnipeg.
Carole Samdup
Carole Samdup is a Program Officer at Rights & Democracy, where she has worked for the past ten years on the issue of Globalisation and Human Rights.  In that capacity, her areas of focus have been regional integration in Asia; agriculture and the right to food; and economic, social and cultural rights in multilateral processes.   Carole has also spent ten years living in northern India teaching English to Tibetan refugees.  Before joining Rights & Democracy, Carole worked in the private sector.  She studied East Asian History at Rhode Island College and studied business at the State University of New York.
“Human Rights 101”
Carole will provide an introduction to the concept of human rights and the international system in place to protect them.  She will describe both the advantages and limitations of using a human rights discourse to promote food security, providing examples from communities and from within the UN system.
Graham Riches  “Canadian Context”
Date Slot
Topic Summary
Public Town Hall                   Human Right to Food and Local Food Charters
Graham Riches is Director of the UBC School of Social Work and Family Studies. He has researched and written about food poverty and food justice since the mid 1980s and is an elected member of the new Vancouver Food Policy Council. His publications include’ Food Banks and the Welfare Crisis’ (Ottawa: CCSD, 1986); ‘First World Hunger: Food Security and Welfare Politics’, edited (New York: St. Martins, 1997) and ‘Right to Food Case Study: Canada’, with D. Buckingham, R. MacRae and A. Ostry (Rome: United Nations FAO, 2004).
“The Right to Food in Canada: Recipe for Action’
Don Kossick
“Localizing the RTF”
Name/email adress
Bio
Saturday, 16th
Morning Plenary    Community Mobilization
Herb Barbolet
Herb Barbolet is a food policy and project consultant. He was the co-founder and Executive Director of FarmFolk/CityFolk Society, based in Vancouver, BC.  FarmFolk/CityFolk’s mission is “Working together for food democracy.”  Herb works in the areas of food policy and food democracy, linking food to community economic development, health and safety, environment, social justice, and international development –  from the very local to the global. Herb was instrumental is the setting up of the Vancouver Food Policy Council, he sits on the council and is also a consultant. Herb has been active in community development for 30 years, working with community planning, energy conservation, citizen participation, cooperative housing, and food and agriculture.  He was a founding member of numerous non- profits, cooperatives and limited companies-such as Community Alternatives Society and Glorious Garnish and Seasonal Salad Co. Ltd. He was Executive Director of the Community Planning Association of Canada (BC) for five years and developed cooperative housing for 10 years. He is a panel member on CBC Almanac’s Food Panel and appears regularly in all media, and is co-author of the book FarmFolk/CityFolk, published by Douglas & McIntyre in 1998. Herb holds a BA in Urbanism from the University of the City Of New York, Brooklyn College, a MSW in Community Organization/Community Development from the University of Pittsburgh. He quit two separate – PhD programmes – in community development from the University of Pittsburgh and in Community Planning and Political Economy from the University of British Columbia – when his committees tried to force him to narrow his theses scope. During the past three years Herb has worked on two sub-committees of the Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee. The committees advised on a public participation process for CBAC and developed a highly sophisticated tool for dialogue on the issue of Genetically Modified Food and Feed. Herb was a principal in the Growing Green Project – a federally funded Voluntary Sector Initiative for law, policy and regulatory reform towards sustainable agriculture.
Community Mobilization
Saturday, 16th
Patricia Williams
in process
Morning Plenary    Community Mobilization
Dr. Patty Williams returned to Nova Scotia in 2000 after completing her PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Prior to this she worked as pediatric dietitian at the Janeway Child Health Centre in St. John’s Newfoundland. She was awarded a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship from 2001-03 at the Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre (AHPRC), Dalhousie University, and was able to combine this with a faculty position in the Department of Applied Human Nutrition at Mount Saint Vincent University (MSVU) where she is now based. Working collaboratively with the Nova Scotia Nutrition Council (NSNC), the Canada Action Program for Children and Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program-funded Nova Scotia Family Resource Centres/Projects, AHPRC and provincial and national advisory committees, she had led a program of research that focuses on the use of participatory research and capacity building to influence policy and system change for food security.
National Community Food Security Mobilization Initiatives: The Experience of the NSNC/AHPRC Food Security Projects
The Nova Scotia Nutrition Council (NSNC)/ Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre (AHPRC) Food Security Projects have worked together with a National Advisory Committee to apply and examine an evolving participatory process that has led to capacity building outcomes at local, provincial and national levels.  The project’s participatory process facilitated the development of a plain language workbook entitled “Thought About Food?: A Workbook on Food Security & Influencing Policy”. The intended use of this resource is to give people in communities throughout Canada a set of tools to raise awareness about food security and to work with others to influence policy and system change to address food security issues.  Participatory processes allowed the workbook and its transferability as a National Resource to be informed by input from individuals who have used and plan to use the workbook to conduct community dialogues in Nova Scotia, participants of a National Dialogue held in PEI in November 2003, as well as other project partners, including members of National Advisory and Provincial Steering Committees. The workbook is currently being used by participating community groups in NS to facilitate dialogue among community members and policy makers on food security, and funding has been secured to pilot test the workbook in select communities across Canada.  This workshop will illustrate how this participatory process has resulted in a growing national commitment to address the root causes of food insecurity through capacity building for policy change.
Rural Northern Community Mobilization
Charlene Rowland Youth Mobilization
Morning Plenary    Community Mobilization
Charlene Rowland has been actively involved with the Youth in Alternative Agriculture Movement for over ten years. Her work includes being a founding member of the River Hills Eco- village located near the Whiteshell Provincial Park, Manitoba. She enjoys studying Permaculture design and graduated from a two week Permaculture Designer’s Certification course in Sonoma County, California during June 1996. Charlene helped to develop & coordinates the Organic Farm Mentorship Program. This unique project uses hands-on work experiences facilitated by local organic farmers to teach young apprentices valuable farming techniques & skills. Currently, Charlene has been working in the Winnipeg School Division teaching Food Security Issues to high school students as part of an ongoing Youth Outreach Project.
Mobilization has been defined as: -to make mobile. -to assemble, prepare, or put into operation for war or another emergency. While the term “war” may seem a little strong, especially during this time in World history, I think it is pretty safe to define the current system of agricultural policies, food production and distribution, as being in a “state of emergency.” While their numbers may be small, there does exist an international Youth Mobilization Movement working to not only dismantle the dysfunctional agricultural systems, but to create positive community food designs that can bring peace to this “war on food”. My experiences working on many different alternative agriculture projects with young people for over ten years have allowed me to not only understand a youth perspective, but have also given me the opportunity to help other young farmers find access to new skills and knowledge. It is of vital importance to the food security network, our rural communities, and the planet, that young people begin to take a more active role in designing and maintaining a healthy food system. By empowering youth through education, both in schools and on actual farms, we can encourage them to mobilize toward a food secure future.
Morning Workshop
Food Charters
Suzanne Hawkes
The workshop will be led by Suzanne Hawkes, Senior Counsel at IMPACS. Suzanne Hawkes is the co- founder of IMPACS Communications Centre, Canada’s first non-profit public relations firm dedicated to serving the non-profit sector.  Suzanne has worked with a wide range of not-for-profit organizations over the past decade as a trainer and consultant on strategic communication planning, opinion research, media relations, message development and issue advertising across Canada and internationally.  Her clients include the Certified Organic Associations of BC, Green Communities Association, LEAD International, Tree Canada Foundation, Green Budget Coalition, Community Foundations of Canada, Sierra Club of BC, and the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, among others.  Suzanne has a Master’s degree in Resource and Environmental Management, a background in community and professional theatre, and serves as President of the Board for the internationally- renowned Holy Body Tattoo dance company.
Communication Strategies
This fast-paced, 90-minute interactive presentation will cover the key elements of successful, strategic communications for not- for-profits and food security organizations. We will look at a range of issues, including: How do we measure success? What are key considerations in developing our messages (some polling information specific to food issues from a consumer perspective will be shared in this messaging section of the workshop)? What are examples of the kinds of communication strategies social and environmental change organizations have used successfully in the past?
Don Kossick
Morning Workshop
Christine Johnson
Christine Johnson is currently working as Project Coordinator for the Participatory Food Costing Project of the Nova Scotia Nutrition Council and Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre.  This project aims to develop a model of food costing for the province by working in partnership with Canada Action Program for Children and Canada Prenatal Nutrition Prorgam funded Family Resource Centres/Projects in NS.  Christine will graduate with a MSc Applied Human Nutrition with Intergrated Dietetic Internship this October.  She has been involved with the Food Security Projects of the NSNC/AHPRC since 2001 and her thesis research focused on examining capacity building processes and outcomes that occurred as a result of involvement in a program of participatory research – the Participatory Food Security Projects.
Participatory Approaches to Community Mobilization and Policy Change for Food Security in Nova Scotia
Recognizing the need to address evidence of growing food insecurity in Nova Scotia, with system redesign through policy change being necessary for sustainable solutions, the Nova Scotia Nutrition Council (NSNC), Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre (AHPRC) and individuals from Family Resource Centres and Projects, hereinafter referred to as the Core Partners, came together to examine the issue within the context of informing policies that would build food security.  With this goal, the Core Partners planned and implemented a participatory process of food costing throughout Nova Scotia to determine the cost and affordability of a nutritious diet. Food costing has traditionally been conducted by professionals in the past with advocacy efforts occassionally having an impact on welfare rates. However, neither the process for collecting the evidence to inform policy nor the policy change itself have been sustained.   Participatory processes, focusing on community capacity building for influencing policy, are viewed as a viable and more sustainable solution . Building on the participatory research approaches to this provincial food costing initiative, similar approaches have been used by the Core Partners in undertaking the additional projects involving Story Sharing Workshops and Community Dialogues on Food Security. This workshop will provide an overview of the participatory research process, the capacity building outcomes that have resulted, and how the research is being used to work towards healthy public policies to address food insecurity in Nova Scotia.
Morning Workshop
Patty Williams
Holly Thomas
Participatory Approaches to Community Mobilization and Policy Change for Food Security in Nova Scotia
Recognizing the need to address evidence of growing food insecurity in Nova Scotia, with system redesign through policy change being necessary for sustainable solutions, the Nova Scotia Nutrition Council (NSNC), Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre (AHPRC) and individuals from Family Resource Centres and Projects, hereinafter referred to as the Core Partners, came together to examine the issue within the context of informing policies that would build food security.  With this goal, the Core Partners planned and implemented a participatory process of food costing throughout Nova Scotia to determine the cost and affordability of a nutritious diet. Food costing has traditionally been conducted by professionals in the past with advocacy efforts occassionally having an impact on welfare rates. However, neither the process for collecting the evidence to inform policy nor the policy change itself have been sustained.   Participatory processes, focusing on community capacity building for influencing policy, are viewed as a viable and more sustainable solution . Building on the participatory research approaches to this provincial food costing initiative, similar approaches have been used by the Core Partners in undertaking the additional projects involving Story Sharing Workshops and Community Dialogues on Food Security. This workshop will provide an overview of the participatory research process, the capacity building outcomes that have resulted, and how the research is being used to work towards healthy public policies to address food insecurity in Nova Scotia.
Dr. Patty Williams returned to Nova Scotia in 2000 after completing her PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Prior to this she worked as pediatric dietitian at the Janeway Child Health Centre in St. John’s Newfoundland. She was awarded a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship from 2001-03 at the Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre (AHPRC), Dalhousie University, and was able to combine this with a faculty position in the Department of Applied Human Nutrition at Mount Saint Vincent University (MSVU) where she is now based. Working collaboratively with the Nova Scotia Nutrition Council (NSNC), the Canada Action Program for Children and Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program-funded Nova Scotia Family Resource Centres/Projects, AHPRC and provincial and national advisory committees, she had led a program of research that focuses on the use of participatory research and capacity building to influence policy and system change for food security.
Morning Workshop
Laurel Gardiner
Laurel Gardiner is an independent advisor and educator, promoting cross-sector teamwork Aboriginal and Northern communities to move people from Welfare to the Workforce through employment and training and community economic development. Laurel is a nurse, and a teacher with a Masters in Health Promotion. Laurel has worked for the last 25 years with First Nations in Northern Manitoba.  She began as an outpost nurse with Health Canada, and continued as a high school teacher in Pukatawagan, an instructor in Keewatin Community College, and Zone Health Educator for Health Canada. Most recently she managed a program called “Building Sustainable Workforces” at MKO.  While she worked in Pukatawagan, she became aware of the impact of welfare and provider role-loss on men, their families and the community and began to actively incorporate welfare reform into nursing, teaching, and health promotion. Laurel lives by Black Elk’s words, “Vision without action is only a dream, Action without Vision is only a chore, but Vision with Action can change the world!” Laurel is married, with three daughters and one grandson and lives in Thompson, Manitoba.
Mobilization in the North
In this 1 1/2 hour workshop participants will discuss mobilizing community human, material, natural, and financial resources towards the collective vision of what they want their community to become. Workshop sections will progress from an introduction to community resources, the visioning process, getting people to participate, and keeping it going. We will then work through the vision wheel with regard to participants issue(s) of choice (likely related to some aspect of food security.) I will tie it together with a summary of a powerful process called Leading Change which provides very practical steps for mobilizing change in organizations or communities.
Morning Workshop
Brent Warner Farmer’s Markets
Brent Warner is the Industry Agritourism Specialist with the BC Ministry of Agriculture and Food and secretary of the North American Farmers Direct Marketing Association. (NAFDMA) • 1985 created the South Vancouver Island, the Fraser Valley, and the Okanagan Direct Farm Marketing organizations • 1994 he was awarded the Agrologist of the year by the British Columbia Institute of Professional Agrologists • 1999 he helped to launch the BC Association of Farmers’ Markets which in 2004 represents approximately 50 % of the urban markets in the Province • longest serving member on the Executive Board of the NAFDMA (13 years) and the board liaison to the North American Farmers’ Market Coalition. • 2000 recipient NAFDMA, “Outstanding Leadership Award”. • 2002 he co-authored ,a marketing guide for progressive farmers, “Marketing on the Edge” which is available across North America  Due to the rapid change affecting agriculture world wide, he has been invited to share his insights and energies on family farm survival from Hawaii to Prince Edward Island and California to Boston.
An important link between healthy food and healthy children. In order for farmers’ markets to be successful they must be aware of the issues affecting their customers. This session will outline the impact of converging trends such as health care, demographics ,and the crisis in agriculture. Learn how solutions to the childhood obesity crisis can provide the impetus for revival in regional agricultural economies. Multi faceted approaches to activity and diet present opportunities to develop healthy local food systems.
Morning Workshop
Marjorie Bencz
Marjorie Bencz has been Executive Director of the Edmonton Gleaners Association: “Edmonton’s Foods Bank” since 1989. She has been with the organization since 1987. Some of Marjorie’s post-secondary education, related to the non-profit sector, includes a National Certificate in Voluntary & Non-Profit Sector Management, and she is a graduate of Grant MacEwan College’s Voluntary Sector Management Program. Marjorie is a past-chair of the Edmonton Loan Community Fund, which provides loans to low- income people so they can start small businesses. She is a Rotarian. She is also on the Executive of the Alberta Food Bank Network Association (AFBNA) and is the current Chair of the Canadian Association of Food Banks (CAFB). Marjorie is a Board member of the Edmonton Community Foundation. In April of 1997, Marjorie was recognized as a Distinguished Citizen and received an honorary diploma in Health and Community Studies from Grant MacEwan Community College and was Global TV’s Woman of Vision for December 2000.  Marjorie received Edmonton Social Planning Council’s 2001 Award of Recognition and in 2003, she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Grant MacEwan Community College.
Moving Beyond Food Banks
Many Canadians are concerned about the number of people in our communities who need to use Food Banks.  Food Banks play an unique and challenging role in our communities. In the MOVING BEYOND FOOD BANKS WORKSHOP, we will find out more about what Food Banks are doing in the areas of advocacy, public education and relationship development.  Discussions will  include how we can work closer with our local Food Bank and similiar organizations.
Heidi Magnuson- Ford
Heidi has worked at Winnipeg Harvest, Winnipeg’s food bank and distribution hub, for three years as Agency Liaison.  In this capacity she has opportunity to develop relationships with a variety of organizations that serve physical, social, spiritual and mental needs of individuals and families across Winnipeg. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Education and a Masters of Divinity from the Faculty of Theology at the University of Winnipeg.  She serves on the board of the Canadian Association of Food Banks as secretary.
Stuart Clark
Panel Discussion   Structuring Our Food Security Movement
Marjorie Bencz
Marjorie Bencz has been Executive Director of the Edmonton Gleaners Association: “Edmonton’s Foods Bank” since 1989. She has been with the organization since 1987. Some of Marjorie’s post-secondary education, related to the non-profit sector, includes a National Certificate in Voluntary & Non-Profit Sector Management, and she is a graduate of Grant MacEwan College’s Voluntary Sector Management Program. Marjorie is a past-chair of the Edmonton Loan Community Fund, which provides loans to low- income people so they can start small businesses. She is a Rotarian. She is also on the Executive of the Alberta Food Bank Network Association (AFBNA) and is the current Chair of the Canadian Association of Food Banks (CAFB). Marjorie is a Board member of the Edmonton Community Foundation. In April of 1997, Marjorie was recognized as a Distinguished Citizen and received an honorary diploma in Health and Community Studies from Grant MacEwan Community College and was Global TV’s Woman of Vision for December 2000.  Marjorie received Edmonton Social Planning Council’s 2001 Award of Recognition and in 2003, she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Grant MacEwan Community College.
Stuart Clark is currently the Senior Policy Advisor to the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.  For the past thirty years he has worked in the field of food processing, international agricultural development, food aid and farming.  His current work focuses on international agricultural trade rules, Canadian food aid and international development policy and the Right to Food in the international context.  Stu lives in Winnipeg.
Debbie Field
Panel Discussion   Structuring Our Food Security Movement
Cathleen Kneen
Cathleen Kneen is the Coordinator (volunteer) of the BC Food Systems Network, which links people and groups across BC engaged in action and policy related to food security. She is also co-publisher (since 1980) of The Ram’s Horn, a monthly newsletter of food systems analysis.
From Back Yard to Front Burner: a look at the theory and methodology used by the BC Food Systems Network to engage community-based food security initiatives in policy analysis and action towards a sustainable and equitable food system in the province.
For the past twelve years, Debbie Field has been the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto. She came to FoodShare through her role as a founding member of the Coalition for Student Nutrition. As a parent she was instrumental in organizing a hot lunch program at her children’s school. A long standing activist in a variety of social movements, Debbie began her work life  in 1976 as a teacher at Brampton’s Sheridan College. Next she was Canada’s first Equal Opportunities Coordinator, working for OPSEU (the Ontario Public Service Employees Union). In 1979, along with four other women, Debbie was successful in her Human Rights’ complaint against Stelco in Hamilton for their no-women hiring policy. She was then hired and worked in the coke ovens until the strike in 1981. In the 1980’s she was the Coordinator of the Development Education Centre, a non-profit resource centre specialising in third world issues, and prior to coming to FoodShare in 1992, Executive Assistant to Metro Councillor’s Dale Martin and Olivia Chow. Debbie has an honour’s B.A. in Sociology from Trent University and a Masters in Adult Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. She lives with her husband David Kraft and their two children, Molly age 16 and Joe age 19, in Toronto’. West-end.
How can we build  the Canadian food security movement so we can focus our attention on the Federal government and make food an important political issue? In a country as large as Canada, with so many regional differences, with no funding from the federal government, what would a national food security movement look like? How can we make sure to address the concerns of low income Canadians who use food banks because they do not have adequate income; of farmers who are going bankrupt because of changes in the food system, of all Canadians worried about growing health problems because the food system promotes the least healthy food options? Bring your creative ideas, your passion for food security and your willingness to compromise to this panel discussion on how to structure our food security movement. Stuart Clark, Cathleen Kneen and Debbie Field, all skilled facilitators will bring provocative questions to lead the discussion tables through a process that will hopefully build consensus, good will and political momentum.
Banquet                               Celebration of Canadian Food Security Movement: *Cnd. Success Stories *Reflections on the Assembly *Youth Reflections Mustafa Koc
Mustafa Koc is an associate professor at the Department of Sociology, Ryerson University where he also works as the director of the Centre for Studies in Food Security. He has been involved in various national and global debates on globalization social and economic development, and food security  such theWorld Social Forum, World Food Summit FYL. Mustafa has been actively involved in the formation of the Canadian Food Security Network and hosted the first Canadian conference of civil society organizations working for food security. Mustafa currently serves on the executives of the research committees of Agriculture and Food, and Social Transformations and Sociology of Development of the International Sociological Association and a member of Oxfam Canada’s Food and Trade Policy Working Group.
Jarem Sawatzky
Jarem Sawatsky teaches in the Peace and Conflict Transformation Studies at Canadian Mennonite University.  One of his key areas of interest is  the role of environment and survival in peacebuilding design.  He has written a number of articles on peacebuilding, restorative justice and social change. Jarem has served as peace and conflict consultant, facilitator, trainer in various local and international settings.